Bonnie Harris Tag

A few weeks back I noticed a post on the New York Times small business blog about hiring. In that post, small business owners were lamenting the fact that even with current unemployment rates they still had a tough time finding qualified workers. In fact, one owner said if you were an online marketer you could pretty much write your own ticket.  Right after I read that article my friend and freelance writer Aniya Wells sent me this guest post about courses on online marketing at MIT. I'm not saying we should all dump our careers to become online marketers, but if you're interested in doing more online marketing for your business these might be good classes to consider! - B.  3 MIT Open Courseware Opportunities for Online Marketers There are so many ways to go about marketing and promotion online. From establishing a social media presence to keeping up to date with the latest SEO techniques, online marketers have to deal with an ever changing landscape of user-drive content and experiences. Because the use of the internet has such a fundamental human element, those of us who market online can never stop learning about humans, what makes them tick, and how they use technology.

Since this is a slow week for us in the U.S., I thought I would bring back some of the more popular posts that people seems to really use. If you've got a book, radio is still a great complement to a book marketing campaign. These tips still apply...enjoy! Last June I wrote about pitching radio in 10 steps. Since then, advertising is up and free spots are DOWN, making it a bit harder to gain those coveted drivetime spots. Be sure to check out 10 Tips for Pitching Radio - these basic points still apply, as do my tips for Being a Great Radio Guest. I've also included a sample pitch at the bottom of this post...this pitch got over 50 interviews for my client! Here are a few more ways to see if you can get noticed and booked on a radio station.

These days, the only job that seems to keep me interested is the one that combines quite a bit of disparate activity. In PR, we are part counselor, salesperson, troubleshooter, secretary, creative, mediator...you name it and we do it. As a kid I wasn't much different. I had two main career aspirations - surgeon and go-go dancer.  In some ways, dissection and dancing go hand in hand in the public relations business -  so maybe I'm not that far off from my childhood dreams. When I was 4, remember it was the sixties and go-go dancing was all the rage. I had the COOLEST pair of patent leather go-go boots, and the shimmeriest shiniest mini- skirt you've ever seen. Me and my friend Sheri would practice go-go dancing on the stone wall between our houses for hours. This is not unlike the activity involved with a pitch. Dress it up, make it snazzy, tap dance your way onto the phone with an editor and then hit 'em with your jazz hands. (Everyone, do your jazz hands now. You know you want to.) That's the outward appearance of PR to most people. We're glad handers, salespeople, we add the "ta da" to the "to do". But in reality, there's quite a bit more surgery involved than people are aware of.

These days it seems like you need to have a bumpit to create new words. Sarah Palin might refudiate that remark but I think Snooki and her guidos feel it's high time to get some Jersey Shore lingo into the Oxford English Dictionary. Personally, I told someone I had spent considerable time catharterizing this weekend - not to be confused with being catheterized or jazzercizing - after getting dumped unceremoniously by a friend. (Note to readers - at this point I do not have a bumpit) [caption id="attachment_2640" align="alignright" width="204" caption="Snooki has a future as an English teacher"]Snooki has a future as an English teacher[/caption] It made me wonder how words evolved in the first place. How did certain words become accepted into normal use and eventually accepted in the main dictionaries we all use?  Like humongous. Or ginormous, or a zillion. For example, Humongous is in the Random House Dictionary as

I've been chewed out one too many times by a fierce, brilliant magazine editor, and yet a great feature in a national print monthly is still a plum placement. I asked an old editor of mine (in my brief freelance writing career) to spill the beans on what these folks REALLY want. And how to avoid totally pissing them off. Sheri Wallace is the former  Editor-in-Chief of ePregnancy magazine and Associate Publisher of REAL Magazine, with respective bi-monthly national newsstand circulations of 400,000 and 250,000. She doesn't mince words so read on...

[caption id="attachment_1337" align="alignright" width="222" caption="Oh my god we can market in a NEWSPAPER"][/caption] I've been hopping into the internet marketing forums to learn more about SEO for blogs lately. Suddenly I started seeing all these online gurus touting the benefits of making loads of money in "offline marketing". Huh?

[caption id="attachment_1284" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="(MICHAEL ROZMAN/WARNER BROS.) "][/caption] After the success of my last blog post on pitching freelance writers I decided to start a weekly feature called "How to Pitch". I'd like to encourage readers to comment with their own tips and ideas. Also, please let me know if there is a specific show you'd like to pitch. I'll try to interview one of the producers to get the inside scoop! ( If you're curious about being a good TV guest, here's a post on that I did a while ago.) First let's start with basic stuff. Although social media is the craze (and it's cheap) it's still building fans one to one. Although TV numbers continue to decline the medium provides  a huge opportunity to deliver your message one to many.  But for most people regular press releases and pitches probably won't get you in the door unless there is a show already planned -  that your message or back story fits perfectly. That can happen, but then you're depending on luck. It's better to create your own pitch, which means thinking like a producer and coming up with a compelling segment all your own. (At the end of this post I've included an actual pitch that got my client on Montel, just to show you a successful sample.)  Here are the steps for creating your own pitch - whether it's local or national, this is really how it works on most talk shows. Authors, it works the same for you. Unless you're already well-known, you need to come up with a unique idea to help sell your book.