Bonnie Harris Tag

by Beth Graddon-Hodgson For some businesses, choosing a topic isn’t quite as easy. It’s always important to write with your target demographic in mind, but with a business that caters to a broad range of people like a catch-all online retail website; who are they and what do they care about? There are a number of questions that you can ask yourself when establishing a blog for your business. They are the ones that I go through to hone in on a specific topic area for a client who can go in any direction with their blog.

[caption id="attachment_1182" align="alignright" width="150" caption="Chinese symbols for fame"][/caption] Woo woo alert!! Readers, since you're so enamored with the Feng Shui tip about wearing red underwear to give you energy on TV, I thought I'd provide five ways to use the ancient Chinese art of feng shui to improve the results of your PR campaign. Think this is weird? The Chinese often refuse to erect a new office building in China until  it's been certified for Feng Shui. Here in this country, folks like Roger Green and Carole Hyder are in high demand for their feng shui workshops and consultations. When I did Carole's PR, people used to line up out the door at her book signings. First find the area of your office or home on what they call the Bagua that is the "fame" area. (It's basically the back middle area of your office) Then it's time to decorate.

A decade ago I sat in meeting after meeting in Silicon Valley hearing about the new economy and how the 'old school' IT companies were dead. It's so funny to me now, listening to all the social media experts and Web 2.0 pundits say that 'traditional PR is dead.' I venture to say that lazy people hope by saying traditional PR is dead, maybe they can make it so. After all it's a whole lot easier to sit in your jammies and tweet and facebook the night away than it is to call Patty Neger at Good Morning America to find out if she likes the latest book you've sent her. Believe me, I would much rather be trading snarky barbs with folks like @CLE84 than getting rejected for yet another story idea by a crusty print reporter.

In honor of being incredibly lazy this week, here's one of my fave 2009 posts - the last Friday of every month I'll throw a repeat of one of the more popular posts, just in case you missed it! [stextbox id="alert" color="000000" bgcolor="17e8e8"] A product, service or book is probably the greatest thing in the world - to its creator. But when an editor or producers says "pass" it's the publicist who has to tell the client. Sometimes ZERO  media are interested. And for anyone who has written a book, started a business or provided a service, that can be a pretty personally hurtful message no matter how carefully it's couched. For me, it's the equivalent of having to tell clients "your baby is ugly" 95% of the time, without hurting their feelings. Nearly impossible.

[caption id="attachment_887" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="John Wooden, the greatest coach of all time"][/caption] A couple years ago I started a coaching service called Waxcoach - it was a fun and inexpensive way to help small business owners, authors and entrepreneurs learn the basics of PR and tactics for doing it themselves. And then I got REALLY busy working on some high profile campaigns like Dan Buettner's The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who've Lived the Longest , Yale University's Weight Bias Campaign and others. Time's a bit more manageable now and I'm really excited to announce that I'm doing one on one coaching again. Here's the scoop - it's pretty affordable, you just buy a package of hours - minimum of 10 at $125 per hour. Folks who read this blog also get a 30 minute phone consultation totally free.

We've had some juicy celebrity crisis' lately that make writing this post lots of fun. When your company, product or personal brand encounters a crisis it's important to decide what 'voice' you're going to use.  Choosing the right approach is one of the reasons little-known (but uber-powerful) flacks like Marty Chalmers and Eliot Mintz make the heavy wood.  Let's take a look at some of the characteristics of voices being used most recently - as well as a few thrown in from the past.

Above It - How can I write this post without addressing Tiger Woods' current situation? As I write this, he has refused to meet with the police and has posted a note on his website thanking his well- wishers and telling everyone the rumors are all lies and he wants to keep this 'private'. First of all, not cooperating with the police right away sends the message that the guy has something to hide. Second, he doesn't tell us what happened. Apparently we aren't privileged enough to hear the real story. How would we feel if Oprah showed up 50 pounds thinner and refused to tell us how she did it? This voice implies arrogance and an attitude that Tiger's above it all. Not a good move for America's favorite sports hero and NEVER a good move if the law is involved.