worst pr pitches Tag

Since this is a slow week for us in the U.S., I thought I would bring back some of the more popular posts that people seems to really use. If you've got a book, radio is still a great complement to a book marketing campaign. These tips still apply...enjoy! Last June I wrote about pitching radio in 10 steps. Since then, advertising is up and free spots are DOWN, making it a bit harder to gain those coveted drivetime spots. Be sure to check out 10 Tips for Pitching Radio - these basic points still apply, as do my tips for Being a Great Radio Guest. I've also included a sample pitch at the bottom of this post...this pitch got over 50 interviews for my client! Here are a few more ways to see if you can get noticed and booked on a radio station.

I've been chewed out one too many times by a fierce, brilliant magazine editor, and yet a great feature in a national print monthly is still a plum placement. I asked an old editor of mine (in my brief freelance writing career) to spill the beans on what these folks REALLY want. And how to avoid totally pissing them off. Sheri Wallace is the former  Editor-in-Chief of ePregnancy magazine and Associate Publisher of REAL Magazine, with respective bi-monthly national newsstand circulations of 400,000 and 250,000. She doesn't mince words so read on...

[caption id="attachment_1284" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="(MICHAEL ROZMAN/WARNER BROS.) "][/caption] After the success of my last blog post on pitching freelance writers I decided to start a weekly feature called "How to Pitch". I'd like to encourage readers to comment with their own tips and ideas. Also, please let me know if there is a specific show you'd like to pitch. I'll try to interview one of the producers to get the inside scoop! ( If you're curious about being a good TV guest, here's a post on that I did a while ago.) First let's start with basic stuff. Although social media is the craze (and it's cheap) it's still building fans one to one. Although TV numbers continue to decline the medium provides  a huge opportunity to deliver your message one to many.  But for most people regular press releases and pitches probably won't get you in the door unless there is a show already planned -  that your message or back story fits perfectly. That can happen, but then you're depending on luck. It's better to create your own pitch, which means thinking like a producer and coming up with a compelling segment all your own. (At the end of this post I've included an actual pitch that got my client on Montel, just to show you a successful sample.)  Here are the steps for creating your own pitch - whether it's local or national, this is really how it works on most talk shows. Authors, it works the same for you. Unless you're already well-known, you need to come up with a unique idea to help sell your book.

We've had some juicy celebrity crisis' lately that make writing this post lots of fun. When your company, product or personal brand encounters a crisis it's important to decide what 'voice' you're going to use.  Choosing the right approach is one of the reasons little-known (but uber-powerful) flacks like Marty Chalmers and Eliot Mintz make the heavy wood.  Let's take a look at some of the characteristics of voices being used most recently - as well as a few thrown in from the past.

Above It - How can I write this post without addressing Tiger Woods' current situation? As I write this, he has refused to meet with the police and has posted a note on his website thanking his well- wishers and telling everyone the rumors are all lies and he wants to keep this 'private'. First of all, not cooperating with the police right away sends the message that the guy has something to hide. Second, he doesn't tell us what happened. Apparently we aren't privileged enough to hear the real story. How would we feel if Oprah showed up 50 pounds thinner and refused to tell us how she did it? This voice implies arrogance and an attitude that Tiger's above it all. Not a good move for America's favorite sports hero and NEVER a good move if the law is involved.