Public Relations

Technology is growing and advancing at a rapid rate. Things that we never thought would exist are now part of our daily lives. From the invention of the home computer, the smart phone, and now the rise of AI machines, technology is evolving exponentially. One of the areas of tech that is growing the fastest is mobile technology. Over 80% of Americans own a smartphone as of February 2019 and the world of technology has improved with the growth in the number of users. Companies large and small are catering to the mobile platform with new developments. The customer experience is being vastly improved to be quick, easy, and painless. This is adding to the already existing convenience mobile technology offers. As the platform of choice shifts towards mobile in a big way, new trends will emerge. Over the next two years, the mobile industry will roll out many new improvements. Here are a few that we expect to see by 2020.

More Proactive Apps

Artificial intelligence might sound like a far-fetched idea, but the technology is already in use throughout mobile apps. AI is helping customers get what they want within a matter of seconds, all thanks to intelligent machines. From the minute most apps are opened, an AI is working to make the customer experience as smooth as possible. A good example of AI in action is when you are sent a message on an app like LinkedIn. Once the message comes through, the user is offered a number of ways to click and read the message. When the user goes to type a reply, an AI suggests things to write based on the context of the first message. These suggested sentences are designed so the user could conceivably click an auto generated response without needing to type anything. These generated responses are normally well written and related to the initial message; this is entirely possible due to AI. This proactive feature only adds to the amount of assistance we receive from apps everyday. More productive AI assisted apps will run faster, smoother, and offer more features than ever before. Your phone is getting to know you better and will use that to make your experience better.

Mobile First Indexing

mobile first indexing For a while now Google has been working on mobile first indexing to make websites more mobile friendly. Since much of the market has shifted away from home desktops and towards mobile phones, Google is taking steps to ensure mobile friendly websites rank higher in its eyes. Google will monitor websites and determine how they rank based on Google’s criteria, which is now prioritizing mobile friendly websites. This means features like easy to use buttons, quick loading, proper formatting for ease of use on mobile, and other aspects will result in websites ranking higher. In order to boost your website’s ranking on mobile, you will need to have a quality mobile site that is different than your desktop site.  

Personalized Mobile Experiences

A clear understanding of your target audience is essential to marketing success. It should shape everything from your brand’s tone and messaging to your content style and distribution. And knowing your audience isn’t as simple as having a typical customer in mind. True depth of...

Narratives compel us. They’re familiar. They’re memorable (22 times more memorable than facts, according to one psychologist). So it’s no wonder that in an era of constant digital sharing and connection, companies who master brand storytelling are achieving – and maintaining – a global following....

Trust isn’t easy to come by in today’s marketplace, where most consumers conduct online research before making a purchase. Thought leadership is one of the most worthwhile marketing strategies for attaining consumer trust and boosting brand value. Not only does this marketing strategy keep your content well from running dry, but it also helps your business attract website visitors, talented employees, potential partnerships and new customers. Despite its lofty title, thought leadership is essentially the sharing of industry expertise with the goal of establishing your business as an authoritative leader in the field. Successful thought leadership marketing is about harnessing your existing knowledge and sharing it to inform and inspire others, without specifically promoting your products/services (although you will undoubtedly see an increase in sales). So how is it done? Read on to learn the who, what, where, when and why of turning your brand into a trusted source that consumers turn to.

You have the vision in your mind: what your brand stands for, its personality, what it promises to customers. But despite your best marketing efforts, sometimes brand initiatives don’t quite deliver your glorious vision. It’s probably time to re-evaluate your core brand identity, a practice you should actually do fairly often. Assess the what, why and how of your business to identify your purpose and what sets it apart from your competitors (which also requires some research of the competition). Once you’ve nailed down your objective, then you can start thinking about how best to communicate it to your target audience. These eight strategies will help you take your brand initiatives to the next level.

Consider this - if you're in business today, the media is your customer. For communications professionals, the media is often their primary customer. However for everyone, really, the traditional and new media has become at a minimum a key influencer in the buying decision. Earned media is still one of the most powerful tools in an integrated marketing toolkit.  With stories at a premium you’ve got to understand not only your customer’s experience, but the unique aspects of the media’s buying cycle as well. the media is your customerAnyone in business today will have to understand and work with the media at some point. Digital marketers may encounter them on social media. New business owners may want media to write about their launch. Brand managers might choose earned media (or native ads) as a way to create or change a perception. For whatever reasons, the media is your customer. We all know that buying cycles are becoming increasingly self-directed and the media is perhaps furthest along in this transformation. For some reason people think that just spewing press releases and pitches at media will work. It doesn’t anymore. Some media folks get as many as 100 to 200 pitches a day, or more. Of all the personas we work with as integrated marketers, the media is the one that doesn’t need our help finding stories anymore. It’s out there for them to find, from viral videos to social media buzz. And since dealing with “marketers” was never the fun part of the job, it means that we could be left out. To reach the media, I would argue that you have to influence them from one step of their buying journey to the next, just like anyone else. Here are a few things to remember when the media is your customer:
  • Create personas for the media you want to reach. Most of the time, there will be primary influencers within the different types of media. These can be local TV reporters, bloggers in your niche, freelancers, etc. Each one probably curates information differently, and has a set of characteristics and behavior that can help you identify their buying cycle for stories.
  • Learn where they get their information. Content acquisition behavior is the most important aspect of behavior when the media is your customer. What’s great is that can ask them directly about it. Most journalists and bloggers will tell you where they like to curate information – they’re proud of it. Or follow them on social media and see what they post. This will give you some great information.
  • Place your content where they will find it. When you’ve discovered the common curation sites, this part is easy. It’s no different from the morning show producers looking to the New York Times for their stories as they did ten years ago. Just find their favorite places and post your stuff there.
  • Figure out the timing of their curation as well. I’m no media powerhouse but some marketing vendors like to get featured on this blog. A couple of them have figured out that I’m usually in social media (mainly Twitter) quite early in the morning. They often tag me at that time when I’m more likely to see it. Watch your media folks as well and do the same thing.
  • Support their ongoing stories, don’t just try to pitch. Find out how you can help. Maybe you’re an expert on a topic they write about frequently. Maybe they like to have content written they can spin into a unique post.  I guarantee if you become a trusted source on a particular topic, at some point they’ll do some nice things for your brand.
  • Measure the steps, not the stories. Find out the things that your media customers do that indicate progress. We sent out a pitch once for a blog that was written by a client’s CEO. Not a single person responded. But the traffic for that blog was the highest of any blog that year. Nothing else had changed. Identify a few simple measurements beyond direct response and track them.